Applied Skills

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Applied Skills at Brookswood Secondary

The Applied Skills Department at Brookswood Secondary includes courses from a number of disciplines that cater to almost any interest!  We offer courses in the following areas:

  • Foods
  • Textiles
  • Family Studies
  • Computer Science
  • Woodworking
  • Automotive

Courses we offer:

Home Economics
The Home Economics Department offers courses designed to promote the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and understanding of principles in Foods and Nutrition, and Clothing and Textiles.
The topics of management, consumerism, ecology, leisure activities and careers are also integrated with and applied to the subject matter in these courses. The general goal is to help students live a more useful and satisfying personal, family and community life.

Food Studies 9 (FDS 9)
Learn to cook for yourself, your friends and your family! Students learn the fundamentals of simple food preparation and nutrition. Topics covered include: baking (muffins, biscuits, cakes, cookies, pastries, yeast breads), meats and alternatives (beef, poultry, eggs) cereals and grains, pasta, sauces, soups, salads and desserts.  Evaluation is based on cooking labs, written assignments and projects.

Food Studies 11 (FDS 11)
This course builds upon the knowledge and skills learned in FDS 9. Homemade pasta, international cuisine, family meals and preparing food for special celebrations are a few of the units in Food Studies 11. Evaluation is based on practical labs, Internet research projects and written assignments.

Food Studies 12 (FDS 12)
Make your own salsa, use your creativity to do some advanced baking, learn to budget and prepare meals for living on your own. More challenging recipes and projects are included in this course. Eating disorders and nutrition for a healthy lifestyle are explored. Evaluation is based on practical labs, Internet research projects and written assignments.

Fashion Design 9 (TEX 9)
This is a beginner’s sewing course. The student will use a pattern to make pyjamas and the other projects are the student’s choice. The serger will be used to create a professional finish.

Fashion Design 11 (TEX 11)
For Grade 11 or 12 students who would like to learn to sew but did not take Fashion Design 9 or for students who have taken Fashion Design 9 and would like to continue to develop their sewing skills, this course is for you. The student will be able to choose their own project according to the student’s experience and interest from a variety of patterns and fabrics. Make yourself a top, a dress, a skirt, pants, pyjamas or sew with fleece to make a hoodie or sweatpants! The student will also have the option of completing various fiber arts projects and crafts, such as cross-stich and beading, as well as making a stuffed animal.

Fashion Design 12 (TEX 12)
Fashion Design 12 is a course in which a highly individualized approach allows the student to make choices regarding projects (e.g. student interested in concentrating on children’s wear construction).

Family Studies
Family Studies 11 and 12 (FM 11 and 12)
Study human development from conception, through the prenatal period, to childhood and the teenage years.
– Design a Nursery for a Baby
– “Baby, Think it Over” program
Learn about the transition to and stages of adulthood
– Plan a Dream Wedding
Prepare for living on your own
– Lifestyles issues and challenges of adolescents and adults will be discussedPage | 42 

Computer Science
Have you used a computer lately?  Chances are that you’ve used a computer in the last 24 hours – and that will likely increase as more jobs and careers focus on computer-related technologies in the future.  Whether you are a basic computer user or an expert, taking computer courses are a great way to develop new skills that you know will be relevant to your future.  From graphic design (digital arts) and game design to business computers and publication, every course offers something for everyone.

Computers 10 (INT 10)
Prerequisite:  Grade 9 or 10
Want to do better on computer-based projects in your classes?  How about learn to make your photos stand out? Computers 10 is open to anyone in grade 9 or 10.  Students learn how to use Microsoft Word, Excel and Powerpoint, Adobe Photoshop, Sketh-up 3D design, and even program simple games.  This course is the base course for ALL coruses in the Computers and Digital Technology program.

Computers 11 (ICTX 11)
Prerequisite:  Grade 11 or 12, or completion of INT 10
This course is for students who are interested in learning a wide variety of computer skills and abilities.  This course is open to any student in grade 11 or 12, or any student who has taken INT 10.  This is a survey course, for those interesting in expanding on basic skills with programs such as Word, Powerpoint, Excel, Photoshop, iMovie, Comic Life, iPhoto, Fireworks and more.

Computers 12 (ICTX 12)
Prerequisite:  ICTX 11
This course continues to expand on skills and abilities learned in Computers 11, with an emphasis on learning more advanced software programs, and going above and beyond basic computing.

Digital Media 11 (ICTM 11)
Prerequisite:  Grade 11 or 12 or INT 10
Cartoon characters, invitations, promotions, photo manipulations and more – Digital Media is a course where imagination has no boundaries!  Students learn the basic and advanced techniques with programs such as Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe InDesign.  Not an artist?  Learn how to use the computer to draw complex and unique designs.  Interested in marketing and business?  Learn the skills and techniques behind creating compelling advertisements.  Like photography?  Expand your knowledge of photo-editing.

Digital Media 12 (ICTM 12)
Prerequisite:  ICTM 11
This course continues to expand on skills and abilities learned in Digitial Media 11, with an emphasis on large-scale projects and assignments.

Programming 11 (ICTP 11)
Prerequisite:  INT 10Want to learn how to create games, websites or animations?  Programming 11 covers it all, from 2D and 3D game design to web design.  Students learn practical skills that will benefit them as they pursue a career in programming. We will also explore SPHERO ROBOTICS in this course.  This course is only open to students who have been successful in Computers 10, or with instructor approval..

Programming 12 (ICTP12)
Prerequisite:  ICTP 11
This course continues to expand on skills and abilities learned in Programming 11, with an emphasis on large-scale projects and assignments. This course also features our SPHERO ROBOTICS.

Digital Photography 11 (BAA Course)(YPHOT 11)
Open to grade 10, 11, 12
This entry-level course offers an introduction to the photographic world.  Here you will learn the basics of photography including camera settings, composition, lighting, and photo editing.  This is a great place to start you down the path to a rewarding career or a lifelong hobby.  Content includes portraiture, landscapes, and fine art photography.  Students use software such as Photoshop CS5, Aperture 3, and iPhoto.  Outside speakers, professional software, and photographic field trips make this course interesting and relevant for all levels.

EQUIPMENT:  Digital Single Lens Reflex Camera (DSLR) is the preferred 1st choice of this course.  Point and shoot cameras are a second choice.  OTHER DEVICES, SUCH AS IPHONE CAMERA OR GAMES SYSTEMS ARE UNACCEPTABLE.

Digital Photography 12
Prerequisite: Photography 11 or instructor’s approval
This exciting course builds upon the basics learned in Photography 11 and takes it to a whole new level.  We will explore advanced photo techniques such as Shooting and Editing Raw Images (professional standard image quality), HDR (High Dynamic Range), studio lighting, and colour theory.  We will again work on postproduction skills in Photoshop CS5 whilst students continue to develop their artistic abilities.  Photographic field trips, gallery shows, and outside speakers will make this course interesting and relevant for all levels.

Students who wish to pursue Post Secondary opportunities will have, by the end of this course, produced a portfolio suitable for presenting to institutions.

Yearbook 10 (BAA Course)
Yearbook 10 is an introduction to the skills of desktop publishing, computer layout and design and photojournalism.  Students will work under the guidance of the teacher and editors, while understanding the individual and collaborative responsibilities associated with producing a publication.  This course is designed to give students an opportunity for practical application of a variety of skills involved in the actual production of the school’s yearbook.  Unlike other courses this course requires the completion of an actual product that is intended to best represent a year in the life of the school.  This is a valuable course for anyone considering a career in desktop publishing or graphic design as students will learn to use professional programs such as Adobe Photoshop and InDesign.  See note below for course requirement.

Yearbook 11 (BAA Course)
Yearbook 11 is a course that focuses on the skills of desktop publishing, computer layout and design and photojournalism.  Students will work collaboratively with the teacher and editors.  This course is designed to give students an opportunity for practical application of a variety of skills involved in the actual production of the school’s yearbook.  Unlike other courses this course requires the completion of an actual product that is intended to best represent a year in the life of the school.  This is a valuable course for anyone considering a career in desktop publishing or graphic design as students will learn to use professional programs such as Adobe Photoshop and InDesign.  This course will build upon the skills developed in Yearbook 10 although this is not a prerequisite.

See note below for course requirement.

Yearbook 12 (BAA Course)
Prerequisite:  Yearbook 11 and Instructor’s Approval
Yearbook 12 is a course open to students who have previous experience with desktop publishing, computer layout and design and photojournalism.  Students enrolled in this course will take on a leadership role and serve as the editors for the school’s yearbook.  Students will work directly with the teacher and publisher, gaining valuable skills involved in the actual production of the school’s yearbook.  They will also be involved in the business aspect of the yearbook, including budgeting and marketing.  Unlike other courses this course requires the completion of an actual product that is intended to best represent a year in the life of the school.  This as a valuable course for anyone considering a career in desktop publishing or graphic design as students will learn to use professional programs such as Adobe Photoshop and InDesign.

 

Note:  As part of the course requirement for Yearbook 10, 11 and 12, students are expected to meet tight deadlines, and extra-curricular hours may be necessary.  Student attendance and the meeting of deadlines are an important factor in passing the course.  Students must APPLY to be in yearbook, and priority will be given to students who have successfully completed Yearbook 10 and/or 11.

 

Technology Education
Technology Education courses are all shop courses or studio courses which are available for students to select in Grades 8 to 12. They are all technical courses; that is, they are based on special skills and processes needed in making a product or keeping it running. Many of these are “saleable” skills or abilities which can develop into jobs such as machining, welding, cabinet making, mechanics and drafting.  Technical courses, however, have a much wider function than for occupational training. Technology Education courses also directly benefit students going into engineering, architecture, forestry and technical school courses. They provide the link between the “bright idea” and how that idea is put to use. Finally, Technology Education courses often provide a balance to an overall academic program of studies. Each Technology Education course has two parts: firstly, the shop or studio projects; secondly, the related theory. The proportion of shop work and theory varies from one course to another, but students must be successful in both parts of the course to earn course credit. Costs should not be a deterring factor but students should be aware that the cost of building projects to take home must be paid by the student.

Technology 9 (TECH 9)
This course focuses on problem solving and critical thinking skills. Students will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of design and technology based activities. Knowledge gained in these problem solving activities also will help social learning skills such as team work, leadership roles, decision making capabilities, cooperation and responsibilities.
Projects for the course include:
Term One: Engineering; students will build a truss and bridge that will be crushed, and evaluated.
Term Two: Transportation; projects are balloon car, mouse trap car, CO2 race car.
Term Three: Projects in aeronautics, electricity, lasers, and robotics. The final project is construction of a catapult, and then testing it on the back field.

Wood Technology
The Wood Technology Program offers three strands: Woodworking, House Construction and Carving. Students may elect any or all of these strands.

Woodwork 9 (WW9)
Woodwork 9 is an introductory program which involves various aspects of the cabinet making trade. We begin by studying, designing and constructing a project within specific design guidelines. Emphasis will be given to: awareness and application of wood design; working knowledge of wood (wood species, products, structures, fastenings; and finishing application); safe and correct use of all power equipment and hand tools; a responsible attitude towards fellow students; and maintenance and responsible care of equipment. Evaluation criteria: safety habits, attendance, participation, creativity, ability to follow instructions, work with others, practical achievement, theory, manual dexterity and overall effort. Theory—30%; practical—70%.

Woodwork 10 (TEW 10)
Woodwork 10 serves to review; refine, and further newly acquired skills gained in Woodwork 9. Students will create their own learning experiences through individually designed projects. Emphasis will be given to effective wood design as it applies to traditional cabinet making techniques. Theory will involve safety, power machine skills, and design awareness assignments to a greater extent than covered in the previous course. The majority of time is spent on project work. See Woodwork 9 for evaluation criteria. Theory—20%; practical—80%.

Woodwork 11 (CJ 11)
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the correct use and safe operation of power equipment. Carpentry and Joinery 11 includes: exploring aspects of past and present examples of good industrial design and relating this in the design, planning and construction of wood products to a high standard of craftsmanship; using wood and other related materials as they are used in the industry; using various methods of wood surface protection and finishing; discussing problems and difficulties as related to the mass production of wood products in our industrial world. It also includes the refining of design and cabinet making skills and techniques. Students
will be expected to design, construct and finish a project with instructor’s approval. Emphasis will be on quality, not quantity. Evaluation criteria: motivation, self-initiative and ability to work and solve problems independently are the most important ingredients. Emphasis will be placed on craftsmanship.

House Construction 11
This class works on actual construction of sheds, garages, and houses when possible. The course is divided into two areas:
• Building Construction:
Topics include: selection of property and lot layout; blueprint reading; use of hand and power tools;
subtrades where applicable; footings and foundations; walls and ceilings; roof framing; window and door installation; interior and exterior finishing.
• Cabinet Making and Finished Carpentry:
Students will construct bathroom and kitchen cabinets. Topics include: standard sizes for cabinets,
master layouts, basic framing, drawer and door construction, counter tops, cabinet installation. The
evaluation is based on (i) practical involvement, skill exhibited, accomplishment (60%); (ii) attitudes,
time use and participation (20%); and (iii) theory and tests (20%).

Carpentry and Joinery 12 – Woodcraft Products (Carving) (CJP 12)
Carving 12 is an advanced course. Students will be required to work on at least one major carving during the year. Some examples of projects are song birds, duck decoys, animal and marine life and freeform sculpture. Evaluation is based on practical work.

Carving (Aboriginal Focus) Carpentry and Joinery—Woodcraft Products (CJP 12A)
Student must have Aboriginal ancestry.
Carving 12 (Aboriginal Focus) is an evening course funded by provincially targeted monies for students of Aboriginal ancestry. Students will be educated by First Nations artists and carvers and will learn West Coast First Nations style, design, techniques and culture. Students are expected to complete at least three projects. Evaluation is based on practical work.

Carpentry and Joinery 12 – Woodwork (CJ 12)
As a continuation of Woodwork 11, this course will allow keen students more time and freedom in their woodworking endeavors. Students are required to design, plan and craft. Our goal is to produce unique quality pieces within the confines of sound design. Individual student designed projects highlight the course. This course also includes advanced cabinetry techniques and various methods of wood surface protection and finishing. Cooperation, a good attitude and proper shop conduct are expected at all times from all students. Evaluation is similar to that in WW 11.

Carpentry and Joinery 12 –Cabinet Construction (CJC 12)
As a continuation of Woodwork 11, this course will allow students to design and construct projects that involve drawer and door construction.

House Construction 12 –Residential Construction (CJR 12)
House Construction 12 is an advanced course built upon the skills in House Construction 11. More advanced work and greater proficiency are required at this level. Skills developed are directly related to employment opportunities in the construction trade.

Auto Mechanics
Technical Education 10: Mechanics (TEC 10)
Power Mechanics 10 is an introduction to the history and development of power. The course is developed around two major labs introducing the four-cycle and two-cycle engines, with students being introduced to the theory of the internal combustion engine and its various systems. Emphasis is given to the safe and correct use of hand tools, power equipment and measuring devices during the labs. A responsible attitude towards fellow students and equipment, safe work habits, good shop participation and a development of logical procedures in thought and practice will be encouraged at all times. Evaluation criteria: Ability to follow repair instructions, labs and quizzes.

Automotive Technology 11 (AT 11)
AT 11 is a beginner to intermediate automotive course. The basics of diagnosis and repair of automobiles will be covered. Safety is strongly emphasized through the proper use of tools and shop equipment. The student will be introduced to the proper repair procedure of vehicle components using repair manuals and measuring techniques related to the components. Elementary vehicle troubleshooting and diagnosis will be covered.

Automotive Technology 12 (AT 12)
AT 12 is an intermediate to senior automotive course. The basics of diagnosis and repair of automotive engines will be covered. Safety is strongly emphasized through the proper use of tools and shop equipment. The student will be introduced to the proper repair procedures of engine components using repair manuals and measuring techniques related to the components. Engine troubleshooting and diagnosis will be covered.

Automotive Technology 12 Engine and Drive Train (ATD 12)
Prerequisite: AT 12 may be taken concurrently with AT 12 Drive Train
ATD 12 is a more in-depth senior automotive course. The diagnosis and repair of automotive engines will be continued with emphasis extending to clutches and standard transmissions. Automatic transmissions and differentials are also covered. Safety is strongly emphasized through the proper use of tools and shop equipment. The student will be introduced to the proper diagnosis repair procedure of drive train components. They will be using repair manuals and measuring techniques related to the various drive train parts.

Automotive Technology 12 Electrical (ATE 12)
ATE 12 is a more in-depth senior automotive course. The focus of the course will be on diagnosis and repair of chassis and engine electrical systems. A scanner, multimeter and test light will be used to troubleshoot and repair fault codes in the Engine, Transmission, ABS and Airbag systems. Proper procedures will be covered to isolate and repair the faults as they are diagnosed. Safety is a high priority as students work in the shop.

Brookswood Secondary School

20902 - 37A Avenue, Langley
BC, V3A 5N2
Phone: 604-530-2141
Fax: 604-530-5132